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Malaysia Travel Tips

  

Malaysia Travel Tips

Malaysia is a multicultural and traveller-friendly Southeast Asian destination, with a good mix of touristic activities, ranging from scuba diving to remote island getaways, orang-utan spotting, fascinating tribal longhouse villages and even a heli lounge bar in Kuala Lumpur.

Home to a myriad of cultural identities that speak different languages, the society of Malaysia has been described as “Asia in miniature.” With a mix of Malays with the Chinese and Indian cultures, and an addition of Persian, Arabic, and British, the cultures of Malaysia are as varied as its wildlife.
Highlightsl; If you visit Malaysia, there are certain activities you shouldn't miss out on.
- Head to Sarawak, Borneo, and explore Malaysia's tribal world. There you can soak in Malays' tribal culture and tradition and even meet the locals in a tribal longhouse.
- Dive into the underwater world of Sipadan - Malaysia's only oceanic island situated in the Celebes Seas off the east coast of Borneo. Renown as one of the world's best dive spots, Sipadan Island was morphed and brought to life by coral growing on top of an extinct underwater volcano cone. As you explore its underwater world, you'll get to see some of the 3000 fish species along with the different corals that make Sipadan one of the richest marine habitats in the world. There you'll be able to swim with green and hawksbill turtles, spot sharks, barracuda, bumphead parrotfish, and even whale sharks if you are lucky.
- Some of Malaysia's wonder are out there in the open for everyone to see, so hire a car and explore the Peninsular Malaysia at your leisure.
- If you are up for a challenge, climb Mt Kinabalu, Borneo's highest peak. 20th most prominent mountain in the world by topographic prominence, Mount Kinabaly has been granted UNESCO World Heritage status. If you enjoy outdoor activities but prefer a less challenging quest, go hiking around the tea plantations of the Cameron Highlands.
- You can't leave Malaysia before trying Perenakan cuisine and roaming the colonial streets of Penang. You should also head to the Hawker markets to try a variety of succulent dishes. Order scrumptious treats from the numerous stalls that circle the central eating area and then take them to your table and dig in.
Customs and Etiquette
Given the country's diversity, it's important to know its etiquette and customs. As Kuala Lumpur is a multicultural city, there is a high level of tolerance for foreign rules and etiquette. Even so, it is important to avoid displays of public affection, as it is frowned upon between all couples, whether they are married or not.
Like other Buddhist countries, it is important to take your shoes off before entering a temple. It's also customary to do so when you enter a private residence.
While alcohol is not welcome in Muslim society, it is still widely available as the country welcomes people from all walks of life.
Try to eat with your right hand only, particularly outside urban areas. This rule applies specially in the conservative Muslim north where you have to dress respectfully, which means you need to cover shoulders and legs.
Money
The local currency is the Malaysian ringgit (MYR). If you didn't get a chance to exchange currency prior travelling, there are many opportunities to do so in Kuala Lumpur. You'll get a more favourable exchange rate with moneychangers in local shopping areas rather those in banks, hotels or the airport.
You'll need to carry cash to buy goods from local markets, although there are plenty of ATMs around if you are in Kuala Lumpur. Meanwhile, international restaurants, department stores, and upscale boutiques generally accept credit card payments.
Although tipping isn't necessary, it is appreciated by waiters and taxi drivers.
Weather
Probably one of the reason you are visiting Malaysia in the first place, it is a warm country all year round. Nonetheless, it is also humid, therefore it is crucial to stay well hydrated and take a break from the heat in shopping malls or museums.
The rainy seasons go from March to April and from September to November. Travelling during these months is still advisable as it is slightly cooler. Whether you travel during the months rainfall peaks or not, it is practical to always carry an umbrella as occasional downpours are likely to happen all year round.

 

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